What IBM’s Watson Really Needs is a Human UX Layer

Dear (Super Computer) Watson, I love the way you think. 

Your speed, deep thought/problem solving abilities--You're even crunching data in the fight against cancer, which makes me hopeful.   Because when it comes to artificial Intelligence, your brain is unsurpassed

But really, Watson, your UX (user experience) needs a lot of work. 

Let's take your first personal appearance, the Jeopardy exhibition game of 2011.   What is that on the screen?  A child's drawing of the earth with some crazy crayon strokes for hair (or are those antenna)?   Sorry to be harsh, but it's a Saturday Night Live skit waiting to happen. 

Of course, this was your debut.  There's a learning curve with these things.

But take a look at this recent IBM Watson TV commercial and you're NOT looking any better.

 

                                                  

Honestly, a pulsing light in a black box was the best UX the talented folks at IBM could design?    

Remember Hal the computer in the landmark movie 2001, A Space. Odyssey? Looks like you two had the same designer. 

So I'm calling you out Watson.  It's time you got a face. 

Think about it--

While technologies like artificial intelligence and natural language processing are making huge leaps in our current decade, the UX of this technology has hardly changed at all.  From our ATMs to our Siris, Alexias and Watson, we are surrounded by prompts and voices that we can't see. 

It's a huge disconnect.  Sometimes it's downright creepy.   

The bottom line is this:  

  • For all the advances they're making, AI and NLP developers are ignoring an important piece--the H-factor as in human.
  • As human beings, we are deeply wired to interact with our own kind. And that's why PRSONAS is giving technologies like AI, NLP and bots a holographic human user experience interface. 
  • Powered by Watson, a holographic Einstein can explain the theory of relativity, a holographic Marie Curie can outline the history of treating tumors with radiation and a holographic Stephen Curry can even pitch his latest line of Under Armour shoes at a retailer.

A holographic human user interface makes technology approachable, easy to interact with; and even fun.

Here, see what I mean in this short video from Microsoft's flagship retail store:

 

 

 

PRSONAS is the human UX for technology.  How can we help you connect? 

 

Categories